Mon. Dec. 09, 2019

Last night a DJ fucked my life! (One on too many)

Last Night a DJ fucked my life! Last night a DJ fucked my life… Yes we definitely know that we may not make friends here or there while pursuing on this kind of topics. But isn’t that the definitive work of a medium to try to find answers. Meanwhile on its aim to contribute to a better understanding/acceptance of the scene it’s supposedly dedicated to??? The response is yours, knowing that time always tells. If ever it hasn’t already spoken for itself. And the truth is it definitely has. From the very first DJ’s to appear in what would soon become discotheques. To the central position which is theirs on today’s production…

History, as brilliantly depicted by UK writer Tim Lawrence on ‘Love Saves The Day’, would have its foundations written in a approx. 15 years period time. From the mid-70’s to the end of the 80’s…
Back in the day, music production was still in the hands of musicians. With the help of arrangers and authors. The association between the late Vincent Montana, Jr., Dexter Wansel and PIR pair Gamble & Huff standing as one of its most brilliant illustrations. Itself givin’ to birth to the Philadelphia Sound.

Then, the producers took the center stage, shaping their own sounds that would become instantly identifiable. From Barry White to Maurice White (Earth, Wind & Fire, The Emotions). But also Norman Whitfield (Undisputed Truth, Rose Royce, The Temptations). Or Randy Muller (Brass Construction, Skyy, Funk Deluxe). Not to mention those who appeared during the already post-Disco era like Nile Rodgers & Bernard Edwards (Chic, Sister Sledge). Jacques ‘Fred’ Petrus & Mauro Malavasi (Change, BB&Q Band, High Fashion). Narada Michael Walden (Stacy Lattisaw, Wanda Walden, Sister Sledge). And, last but not least, Leon F. Sylvers III (The Whispers, Dynasty, Shalamar) to name but a few.

Meanwhile, a first recession – in 1979 – and the progressive death of Disco soon after the memorable Disco Demolition Night that took place on Jul. 12 that same year would have countless consequences on the following decade. This with the emergence of new forms of music that saw the light with the assistance of technology. From Hip-Hop and Breakdance to R&B, House and Techno. As many genres that allowed a vast amount of people (beginning with DJ’s) to produce music in their bedrooms. Meanwhile cutting the production to some 6500%. This in comparision with its initial costs (ie: US$ 35,000 for a cut for say Village People for instance).

Last night a DJ fucked my life! Something many studio musicians have probably felt back in the day…

DJ’s, apart from already doing remixes, saw there a natural extension to their activities. Not to mention the opportunity to make themselves some better money in the years to come. Strangely enough, the basic finances would not be found in the U.S. but in Britain. Making this country the epicenter of the Dance Culture with no equivalent back then. DJ’s would soon to become the absolute kings of this world seeing some of them reaching a status which, relatively speaking, could find its equivalent in the one of the current soccer stars. Getting the earnings that come with. Meanwhile, they would find themselves in the obligation to put out regularly new releases or compilations. This in order to generate media exposure and then getting bookings in the clubs.

With this in mind, if some people have brilliantly demonstrated the fact that non musicians could produce (good) music, it has naturally not been the case of everybody. Meanwhile, as a direct result, the quality level of production has considerably decreased along with sales amount. Kraze for instance scored more than 900,000 units with ‘The Party’ at the end of the 80’s. With lots of label managers considering 1,500 as an honest performance 15 years after!

Last night a DJ fucked my life! (One on too many)
We would then see some DJ’s turning themselves into corrupted divas. Claiming for fortunes, 1st class flight ticket(s), four star hotel and a limo pickin’em up at the airport. Meanwhile accepting ridiculous fees in comparison in their home country. Eventually finding last call excuses and disrespecting their word to jump on some more lucrative booking whenever an opportunity presented itself.  When not simply faking, with the obvious complicity of promoters booking people who may be everything except a DJ!!! With the same applying to a whole bunch of productions/compilations. As many releases which, despite being attributed to big names, happened to be the works of some anonymous studio ghost writers…

Some of you may allege against this that it’s nothing but the law of the market. And, to a certain extend, they are right. But how ever would you react paying the price for a Rolls Royce, then being left with something that would reveal itself not being a genuine one at the end of the day (night)???

Last night a DJ fucked my life… Let’s get rid of fakeness!
I guess we all need being way more selective, and simply call a spade a spade… From the labels putting out music to the people playing it. Meanwhile getting once for all rid of those who’re taking us as assholes. Then reestablish the talent as the sole criteria of interest. Something that would drastically reduce the amount of solicitations we’re subjected to on a daily basis. Mind you, we’re supposedly talkin’ about Art, aren’t we???

Editorials – Last night a DJ fucked my life! (One on too many)

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Last night a DJ f**** my beat (and not only!)

Previously in the series…
Embracing music: Curiosity never killed the cat!

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Story teller, record pusher, compiler & web designer...
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